Africa: an emerging destination for investments

One of the major audit firms recently published its index on the attractiveness of Africa for 2017[1]. The report puts into perspective the economic trend of the continent in a rigorous and detailed way, enabling us to avoid the two pitfalls of Afro-optimism or Afro-pessimism.

It should first be noted that 2016 has been the worst year in terms of economic growth for sub-Saharan Africa over the past 20 years. The continent has been hardly hit by the end of the super-cycle of commodities, particularly impacting Nigeria, Angola and South Africa. The geopolitical upheavals of the West such as the Brexit and the election of Donald Trump also contributed to diminishing or at least stagnating investments from these countries which are important investors in Africa. However, while the number of FDI projects fell by 12% in 2016, they increased by 32% in value terms (reaching $ 94.1 billion), making it the second region of FDI growth at world.

Obviously, Africa is not a homogeneous bloc and in fact there are great disparities between countries. The three major countries impacted by the drop in the commodity prices mentioned above should not distract us from the bigger picture that reveals the growing young shoots in French-speaking Africa as in East Africa. While Morocco, South Africa, Kenya, Egypt and Nigeria attract the bulk of FDI projects (57%), other investment hubs appear. Ghana (4th), Côte d’Ivoire (7th) and Senegal (9th) attract investors, as evidenced by their ranking in the Africa Attractiveness Index. On the other side of the continent, growth is also very strong with an average of 6% for Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Uganda. These last two being boosted by the recent discoveries of oil and gas fields.

As nature abhors the vacuum, Asia-Pacific, especially China, has filled the decline in investment from the United States and Great Britain. China is now the third largest investor in terms of FDI projects in Africa, with the strongest growth in terms of jobs created. Note also the breakthrough Japan has seen its level of investment and jobs created increase by 757% and 106% respectively.

These figures, which show a real enthusiasm of investors for the African continent, remain to be relativized and taken in retrospect. Africa still receives an inadequate share of global FDI (11.4%) in terms of its population and its potential. Long coveted for its natural resources, the diversification of the African economy is underway, driven by the dynamism of sectors such as transport and logistics or the automobile. It is also worrying that the share of investment projects carried by African investors has continued to decline since 2013, falling to 15.5% in 2016. This contributes to the degradation of Africa’s resilience to external shocks ‘economy.

That Africa is attractive to foreign investors is a good thing, but it must also become an opportunity for African investors themselves! That is why we must redouble our efforts to achieve greater regional integration and a policy of reducing barriers to trade between the countries of the continent. History has shown that these choices lead not only to economic development but also to political stability, two essential objectives for ensuring the well-being of the population.

[1] EY’s Attractiveness Program Africa, « Connectivity redefined », May 2017

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