Africa Nutrition Map

African Heads of State and Government committed to the goals contained in the 2014 Malabo Declaration, which acknowledges that agriculture and food security are key determinants of nutrition that require coordinated and comprehensive responses from other sectors, including health, education, labour, social protection, and coordinated collaboration with multiple stakeholders.

While it is a well-known fact that Africa hosts half the available arable lands in the world, as a continent Africa still disproportionately suffers from hunger and hunger related diseases such as stunting or malnutrition.

On the margins of the 13th Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme[1] Partnership Platform (CAADP PP) in Kampala, Uganda, the NEPAD Agency publicised the Africa Nutrition Map.  The Africa Nutrition Map is a tool that indicates hot points on the continent with regards to hunger, malnutrition, and food insecurity.  The map also indicates the growing prevalence of less covered “rich country diseases” on the continent such as obesity or diabetes.

The NEPAD Nutrition Map provides a snapshot of Africa’s nutrition context as at the end of 2016. Too many people still suffer from hunger in Africa. Hunger is a by-product of poverty, but the Nutrition Map also provides points to the opportunity for African leaders to take advantage of the continent’s huge agricultural potential in ensuring the provision of nutritious food,” said Kefilwe Moalosi, NEPAD Agency’s Nutrition Programme Officer.

Africa still imports USD$50bn worth of food each year, even though agriculture and its value chains could provide more employment to its youth and food security to its citizens. CAADP was adopted by the continent’s leaders as the framework within which to redress these and other challenges, by putting the necessary reforms in place to trigger the green revolution that Africa needs. 

[1]CAADP, short for the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development, is an African-wide agenda designed to support the transformation of the continent’s agriculture for sustained food security and socio-economic growth.

Africa Day, 25 May 2017

Africa Day is a time for reflecting on who we are – an enterprising, innovative and resilient people. Today we not only celebrate who we are and our achievements, but we also focus on our continent’s future.

25 May, Africa Day, is a day for celebrating the occasion when the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), the precursor to the African Union, was formed in 1963. It is a day when we celebrate the progress made by Africans, while reflecting on the common challenges we face in a global environment.

Industrialisation is the one area in which the continent of Africa needs to make rapid progress. It is not an overstatement that industrialisation is a critical engine for economic growth and development. If managed prudently and effectively it can contribute to creating employment opportunities and re-position the continent to becoming competitive in the global trading environment.

This year, the NEPAD Agency commemorates Africa Day by also celebrating the innovations that entrepreneurs on the continent are developing, under the African Union theme for 2017, Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth.

The growing extent of youth unemployment poses a fundamental challenge for the whole of Africa. About 60 percent of the unemployed are under the age of 25 and young women are especially affected.

On the positive side, Africa has the youngest population in the world, and it is this population that will supply the much needed human capital and innovations in the years to come, even as the continent becomes more and more industrialised.

Even as the continent faces the challenges of integration and industrialisation, many are the innovations that young enterprising Africans are developing to redress development challenges on the continent. Many are the innovations by young Africans that need to be up-scaled that provide solutions in the areas of biosciences (including agriculture), climate change adaptive innovations, ICTs, advanced manufacturing, to name but a few.

On this special day for Africa, we therefore make a call for the need to ensure that investment into industrialisation and innovation is at par with the growing demands for skills development, employment and entrepreneurship from our youthful population. With a footprint in 52 countries on the continent, the NEPAD Agency provides the gateway to boost the expansion of innovations, providing African solutions to Africa’s challenges. Indeed, the more we think regionally, the faster we can grow into ‘The Africa We Want’ by ensuring the skills of our entrepreneurs and innovators are being shaped as they grow, resulting into the overall transformation of all regions on the continent.

 

Commemoration of the Africa Day: showcasing African innovations

Pretoria –  “The best way to believe in the future for Africa, is to believe in our innovations and in our innovators,” Dr Ibrahim Mayaki, CEO of the NEPAD Agency stated in his keynote address at an event held to showcase African innovations.

As part of the commemorations for Africa Day, this year the NEPAD Agency also celebrated the innovations that entrepreneurs on the continent are developing, under the African Union theme for 2017, Harnessing the Demographic Dividend through Investments in Youth.

“There is no better way to celebrate Africa Day than through innovations,” remarked Ms Teresiah Simelane, General Manager for Enterprise Development at The Innovation Hub in Pretoria, South Africa.

Dr Mayaki was speaking today at an event organised by the NEPAD Agency and The Innovation Hub to mark Africa Day, as a time for reflection, celebrating the progress made by Africans, while also reflecting on the common challenges and solutions the continent needs in a global environment.

Africa has the youngest population in the world, and it is this population that will supply the much needed human capital and innovations in the years to come, even as the continent becomes more industrialised. Even as the continent faces the challenges of integration and industrialisation, many are the innovations that young enterprising Africans are developing to redress development challenges.

The exhibition by entrepreneurs at the event in Pretoria, made the case for the myriad of innovations which exist on the continent and need to be up-scaled in providing concrete solutions to some of Africa’s challenges. The young entrepreneurs’ innovations provide solutions in the areas of bioeconomy (including agro-processing and health), climate change adaptive innovations and smart industries (ICTs and advanced manufacturing), to name but a few.

Participants at the event heard from entrepreneurs who showcased innovations from injectable bone graft substitute, to devices that help deaf communities and various other innovations in health, medical, food, beauty, pharmaceutical and manufacturing industries.

“We need innovations to trigger technological developments and other advancements in the framework of Agenda 2063, Africa’s vision for transformation,” Dr Mayaki said.  He added that, “The skills of entrepreneurs need to be shaped in such a way that as they grow, African economies can also grow, with the drive from the continent’s own innovative solutions.”

Dr Mayaki also stated that the commemoration of Africa Day with The Innovation Hub marks the first step towards strengthening collaboration with the NEPAD Agency.

A view from Gambia

Earlier this month I had the privilege to address a Ministerial Cabinet retreat of The Gambia. Some of you might recall that The Gambia was embroiled in a serious political impass between December 2016 and January 2017, and as you may remember the then president conceded defeat then changed his mind. Such an action if left unchecked could have culminated into a massive civil and political unrest in The Gambia with a potential spill-over into the neighbouring countries of Senegal and Guinea Bissau.

Certainly some level of divine intervention together with a well-coordinated approach by ECOWAS and the United Nations- potential disastrous ramifications of the former president’s actions was totally averted, and now The Gambia has set out an agenda to unify its people and re-ignite the economy and so on.

My address to President Adam Barrow of The Gambia and his cabinet, highlighted the principles of governance amongst others. But more specifically, I underscored the need for the president and his team of cabinet ministers to serve the people of The Gambia by providing and guaranteeing their security, protecting their welfare, meeting their basic needs, increasing their wellbeing and protecting the weak and vulnerable. Governments must do those things that give the people confidence, contentment, happiness and hope. My advice to them was that they must respond to the needs of their people for education and skills development, health, employment and social protection.

A responsible government must create the space to allow people to participate freely in the processes of governance. I emphasised to President Barrow that he and his team must build and maintain strong institutions of democracy and ensure that they strictly observe the separation of powers between the executive, the legislature and the judiciary. Furthermore, I sited the Singapore experience and also noted the significant strides that Rwanda is undertaking with regards to economic transformation and attracting private investments.

I concluded my address to the Gambian Cabinet by encouraging them to have a regional approach to doing things and I asked them to reflect deeply on where does The Gambia want to fit in Africa’s transformative agenda. And how quickly is the political leadership ready to establish a road map to achieving such a vision.

 

Africa poised for greatness — but governments must act fast

I am sharing an excellent article from Carlos Lopes on how Africa is underestimated :

Conventional wisdom tells us that the Chinese are buying up Africa faster than any other investors. It tells us that African banking lags in terms of innovation and reliability and that no African country is at the forefront of global innovation.

But conventional wisdom is often wrong and it is important to recognise that we don’t have the Africa we think we have.

What do I mean? Perhaps we can start by noting that China is actually only Africa’s third-biggest investor. The second? France. India is hot on its heels too. If that surprises you, wait until you learn that more than 50% of the world’s mobile banking happens on the continent, with Kenya taking the lion’s share globally.

MORE THAN 50% OF THE WORLD’S MOBILE BANKING HAPPENS ON THE CONTINENT, WITH KENYA TAKING THE LION’S SHARE

I enjoy these kinds of shock statistics, most recently sharing them with an audience of South African Institute of International Affairs members during an address on “World changes affecting Africa”, a talk I have also given to UN leaders, Chatham House and African Union foreign ministers.

Full article here

The future of investment in Africa

The Annual AVCA Conference, held between the 3rd and the 7th of April in Abidjan, provided the private equity and venture capital industry with an important platform to discuss the most pertinent investment opportunities and issues in Africa. For the continents’ biggest investors, investment into infrastructure remained a priority. This makes senses as Africa remains underserved in this area. The UN’s Economic Commission for Africa reports that although governments are keen to build new infrastructure, they still lack the ability to develop proposals needed to attract institutional investors.

The report stipulates that of the total $2 trillion raised globally for infrastructure projects, only $59 billion was received in Africa. This sum represents just 3%. In the promotion of investment into projects and specific sectors, many States still suffer from the poor quality of their ‘signature’ due to the lack of substantial financial resources.

There is some reason to remain positive, investments went well in 2016. Private equity players invested $3.8 billion in 145 deals across Africa last year with a range of businesses from agriculture and energy to healthcare and financial sectors. But over and above gaining support from foreign and multilateral partners, African countries will also need to develop domestic financial capital market instruments for infrastructure. It has become imperative for Africa to bridge the gap between individuals with very high liquidity on one hand, and a private sector and States that struggle to finance themselves, on the other. A doubling of domestic saving available on the continent would bring Africa into line with other emerging regions and would provide at least 250 billion dollars (about 180 billion euros).

Is it not time then to move away from relying on taxes and uneven commodity revenue to look into pension funds to back infrastructure projects? Even in countries where there has been pension reform there is a still a dearth of financial instruments which limits the ability to use pension funds to back infrastructure projects in the first place. The role of the State is fundamental in inventing the necessary instruments to reinject the funds mobilized into the real economy.

Channeling remittances to create diaspora bonds can help play an important role in plugging the development gap. Nigeria is the world’s fifth biggest destination for international remittances with 5 million Nigerians living abroad and sending money back to relatives, according to Western Union. Nigeria plans to raise 300 dollars by selling diaspora bonds, issued in June 2017, targeting Nigerians living abroad.

The challenge is to make each citizen a full-fledged investor contributing to the development of his country. Success stories already thrive in the area of collective management with the recent launch of initiatives promoted by private actors (Amethis West Africa, for example, is the first investment fund registered in Côte d’Ivoire) or public actors (in Rwanda, Agaciro Development Fund aims to capture the saving of migrants).

We must not underestimate the place of innovation in contributing to the prosperity of the financial industry. It is not unusual for state projects to serve as “guinea pigs” before reaching the local private sector. After all, the Renaissance Dam, the most important in Africa, kick-started with the funding provided by the Ethiopians.

How African trade and migration are shaping globalization

Globalization is not simply a process that started in the last two decades or even the last two centuries. It has a history that stretches thousands of years and Africa has been at the heart of international trade for far longer than we imagine. From the trans-Saharan caravans and the triangular trade, from the colonial counters to the Coltan of the Kivu, the continent has lived at the pace of the different periods of globalization, without always being in a position to influence or control, let alone take advantage of, global transactions.

Whether one thinks globalization is a “good thing” or not, it is an essential element of the economic history of mankind. According to Amartya Sen, Nobel-Prize winning economist, globalization “has enriched the world scientifically and culturally, and benefited many people economically as well”. Those more skeptical about globalization associate it uniquely with free market policies and an increase in inequality levels. It is true that Africa, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, has lagged behind other regions in the spread of the global economy, and the overwhelming majority of Africans have not benefited from the purported promises of global prosperity.

But globalization also encompasses the exchange of commerce, culture, ideas, information, people. Global networks have created opportunities for nations and communities to operate on a much larger scale worldwide. Previously disparate locations on the globe are now linked into extensive systems of communication, migration, trade and interconnections. This very phenomenon also makes it possible for emerging countries to strengthen their local and independent identities while working to be part of larger transnational alliances.

In this context, what are the questions that Africa needs to ask itself in order to propel itself to a more proactive actor in globalization?

Trade deals need to show that nations are open for business by putting people’s interests, not just corporate interests, at their heart. What must we put in place to resolve the tensions between democracy, the nation state and global economic integration?

A key feature of globalization is connectivity, as illustrated by the expansion of marine and terrestrial fibre optic cables. This offers unprecedented broadband infrastructure and opportunities to master the digital revolution. How will technologies, central to Africa’s economic and social lives, empower African populations?

Africa has the potential to develop a particular model of globalization. This model is the more pertinent in a world context coloured by the British vote to exit the European Union and the result of the recent US presidential election. The latter events are a symptom of popular disenchantment with globalization and a desire for the reactionary raising of national barriers. On the other hand, Africans continue to be outward-looking. In this context, the phenomenon of south-south migration constitutes an important capital for the continent. Can we redefine migration dynamics away from the binary brain drain / brain gain debate into one of holistic continental development?

Globalisation is not a zero-sum game. It is a two-way traffic involving a historical process of border crossings and hybridization and everyone should benefit from it. There is space yet for Africa, through a particular and renewed set of global transactions, to positively influence the direction that globalization will take in the future.